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Violence on Television

This paper will explore the relationship of television violence and children. By demonstrating the relationship of television violence to violent behavior in children, this essay proposes that television violence helps to create and sustain a popular culture that glamorizes violence. Furthermore, by exposing and desensitizing its children to violent scenes, television encourages violence in society.

Violence on Television

In an article in a 1996 Brown University Child & Adolescent Behavior Letter titled "Bullies See More of TV Violence, Less of Adults," cites research that suggests bullies see more violence on television than other children. Researchers asked 558 sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders at a midwestern middle school. They found children with the highest bullying behavior were also most likely to report significantly greater levels of forceful parental discipline, viewing of TV violence, misconduct at home and in the community, and fighting

In a report titled "Children's Attitudes Toward Violence on Television," authors of this article note that there is an average of one violent scene occurs every 16 minutes on British television. Meanwhile, many British educators have reported an increase in children's aggression both on the playground and in the classroom during the past decade . The report also cites "at least 1,000 research publications" that have published studies linking television violence and actual violence; in over three-quarters of these publications, the authors claimed that such a link does exist, according toan article on violence on television . An article on , "The Effect of Video Games on Feelings of Aggression," confirms findings.

Most researchers agree that television violence has an impact on the behavior of children. However, one study suggests that implied violence can be equally harmful. In their study on "Electrodermal Responses to Implied versus Actual Violence on Television," they noted that implied violence sometimes caused more fear than actual violence. The participants were boys and girls between the ages of 10 and 15 years whose responses to a variety of implied and actual violent video footage were closely measured . The results suggested that an evaluation of television violence should consider all fear-inducing elements, rather than actual violence alone.

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