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Swift's Voyage to Laputa

The third section of Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels is often misunderstood. Get help from the writer's at Paper Masters in understanding Swift's third section, Voyage to Laputa by ordering a custom written research paper that explains the complex work.

If you do not sustain an above average grade in a foreign language, it is likely that you will not understand the implication of the chosen expression in Swift’s third chapter, Swift's Voyage to Laputa. It wasn’t until a friend pointed out to me its significance in Spanish that Swift’s wit of terminology became clear in this instance. Laputa meaning prostitute, depicted as a country that abandons its soul and whores itself out to faddish pseudoscience.

Swift's Voyage to Laputa

This is the depth and extent of Swift’s intelligence and his humor, a complexity that has kept critics and readers scrutinizing his work for decades, attending to every detail Careful review of the text and critical works which supply pertinent particulars about the life and times of Swift help to elucidate some of the most basic facts. Swift, although an obvious lover of knowledge, was an opponent of the new wave of ‘science’ propagated in his day by the Royal Society and popular personalities, a practice whose methodology abandoned reason and failed to live up to inherited expectations. But even as this fact comes into clear focus, it is continually evident that much of Swift will remain always a debatable mystery, known only to the author himself.

To suggest that Swift was knowledgeable in scientific methodology, and infinitely more intelligent than many of his contemporaries or critics, is justifiable. However, there was much of the popularly accepted form of scientific research and development that Swift not only disregarded, but held in particular contempt. Nicolson and Mohler assert that the third part of Gulliver’s travels, his Voyage to Laputa, “has been most criticized and least understood. While agreeing with the majority of criticisms, that the section suffers from multiple themes and episodic characters and lacks philosophic intuition or power, the authors disagree with Eddy’s interpretation that Laputa exists to serve no purpose apart from a “pointless and not too artfully contrived satire on mathematics”. There was in fact an easily discernable point.

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