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About Paper Writing for College

When we think of research, a term paper usually comes to mind. But we perform other types of research, though we might not call it that. For example, I needed a used car and used the Internet to find it. This, too, I discovered, is a form of research.

To properly learn how to research for paper writing in college, read what one of our writer's has used as an example of the research process. By thinking of research as a common, every-day activity, researching for paper writing for college becomes far less daunting.

The Research Process

Very few of us like to visit auto dealers when we are about to purchase a new or used car. That is because we might feel pressured and might well end up with a car – especially a used car – we later realize was not the best one for our needs. Needing a car, but unable to afford a new one, I searched the Internet to see what bargains there might be in a used car. I wanted a Honda Accord because of its reliability and its size – not a big car, but comfortable and fairly roomy.

My first step was to co to www.carpointmsn.com. There, I entered the make and model I wanted, along with my zip code. Up came nearly 80 Honda Accords for sale within 30 miles of my home. Some, of course, were beyond my means, but after checking out more than 12 of the Accords listed, I narrowed down my search to three, on the basis of their age (three years old) and miles driven to date (under 40,000). All three were between $11,000 and $13,000 in price.

My next step was to go to www.interestratecalculator.com, where I calculated the monthly payment if I put down $1,000 and had $10,000 in financing. At a rate of 7.5 percent, I would be paying $241.74 a month – not cheap, but at least affordable.

After that, I did “research” on the dealer’s lots where the three cars were located. Because I planned to check out the car I finally selected before talking to a salesperson, I visited the lot on a Sunday, when the dealership was closed. Three such visits and several hours later, I decided on a silver, four-door Accord with 41,000-plus miles. It was dent-free, with few scratches or other marks, and the interior seemed to be in good shape. At that point, I wrote down the car’s identification number and returned home.

This next step involved logging on to www.carfax.com. This is a great service that lets you know immediately (for a fee of $19.99) whether the car has a clear title, has been damaged by accident, flood, etc., or has other notable problems. All I had to do was enter the vehicle’s ID number and, of course, my credit card number. My printable report came up moments later, and I was pleased to see there were no problems with this vehicle.

Finally, I visited the dealership, where I “researched” my prospective car by inspecting it thoroughly inside, looking for leaks, water in the trunk, and other potential problems. There were none, and after a test drive, where everything worked fine, I sat with the salesman and worked out a deal. Within 30 minutes, I had signed the papers, and later that day I was behind the wheel of my new (for me) car.

Conclusion

I feel the research I did was both necessary and practical. While it cost me about $20 for the carfax report, I had peace of mind, knowing the Accord had been accident-free and no other negative history. My previous basic research of using the Internet to find the car I wanted saved me hours or time and many miles of driving, not to mention being engaged with salespeople at every turn. It is a procedure I recommend to everyone. It is faster, easier, and practically guarantees a hassle-free purchase. Such research, I discovered, is invaluable and even fun!