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Omega Healthcare Thesis

A business or medical health thesis can be written on a major healthcare provider and focus on any aspect you need studied for your hypothesis. Get help on a thesis on Omega Healthcare from the writers at Paper Masters, who are very familiar with the healthcare giant and their services.

“Omega Healthcare” a large regional healthcare provider operating in Southwest Pennsylvania has experienced notable increases in turnover in recent months. Although the organization has considered numerous proposals to effectively reduce turnover through more stringent recruitment and hiring policies, the organization has not addressed the issue of job satisfaction and its role in turnover. Current research on the impact of job satisfaction on turnover clearly demonstrates that increases in job satisfaction will lead to decreases in turnover. As such, there appears to be a direct impetus for management at Omega Healthcare to consider specific policies that can be utilized to improve overall job satisfaction among employees.


Format for Omega Healthcare Research Paper

Chapter 1: Definition of Problem (at least 3 pages, no more than 12 pages)

  1. Omega Healthcare Background
  2. Problem /Issue
  3. Objectives
  4. Assumptions
  5. Definition of Terms
    "What was to be researched?'


Chapter 2: Literature Review (at least 10 pages, no more than 25 pages)

  1. Review of related literature
  2. Minimum of 20 sources of Thesis paper
  3. Journal and books
  4. Organization formal and informal
  5. Speeches or discussions (interviews) with experts
    "What others found in their research."

 

Chapter 3: Methodology (at least 3 pages, no more than 10 pages)

  1. Research approach
  2. Procedures
  3. Decision criteria
  4. Reliability/Validity instruments
  5. Scope and limitations
  6. "Details of how you researched."


Chapter 4: Data Analysis (at least 10 pages, no more than 30 pages)

  1. Collection
  2. Presentation
  3. Analysis
  4. Central tendency-most commonly used
    "Analysis of your research data."


Chapter 5: (at least 4 pages, no more than 12 pages)

  1. Summary.
  2. Conclusions.
  3. Recommendations
    "Conclusions and recommendations resulting from the analysis of your data."
  4. You may also need a statement regarding the implications for additional research.
  5. The final paper structure will include:


a. Executive summary: 2 pages or less. (Sells the paper) (What, Why, Where, How, Recommendations)

b. Table of contents

c. List of tables (if needed) consists of words and numbers

d. List of figures (if needed) anything not a table

e. Body of the report (5 chapters, minimum 30 pages, no more than 90)

f. References

g. Appendixes


1. TITLE: The title should be descriptive and define the subject of the study.

 

CHAPTER I (3-12 pages)

  1. INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND INFORMATION: This section should describe the environment in which the problem exists. It should also present the student's reasons for doing the project, demonstrate an understanding of the problem, and indicate the importance of the project to the student and his/her organization.
  2. PURPOSE STATEMENT: This must include a specific statement to guide the research effort. The overall statement will usually speak to the overall outcome of the study; for example: "to provide management with recommended actions which should reduce or eliminate the stated problem."
  3. PROBLEM STATEMENT: This is a short and concise statement of the problem, which the student has chosen to research. This statement will provide the focus for all research and analysis; it must therefore be constructed very carefully. This may include specific sub-problems to be developed to provide guidance in carrying out the research project; for example: "document the existence of the problem over the last five years," or "determine which factors are seen by employees as being a concern in job satisfaction."
  4. Research objective(s) flow from the problem statement and are sometimes called subproblems. When the sub-problems have been dealt with, the researcher should be able to make her/his final analysis.
    (Hypothesis can be inserted here if one or more is to be used-optional)
  5. ASSUMPTIONS: Explain what assumptions you will be making in your research. For example, "the sample is a representative one", "it is assumed that the current prices/market value will increase no more than 2% per year", "it is assumed that those who choose not to return the survey are similar in their attitudes/behaviors/etc. to those who do return the survey".
  6. DEFINITIONS: Identify and explain terms or acronyms that are specific to your research proposal that were not likely to be familiar to an educated reader, or are subject to very specific or operational definitions in your study.


CHAPTER II (10-25 pages)

  1. REVIEW OF THE RELATED LITERATURE: This describes what content/research areas will be reviewed to assure familiarity with research on this problem. This chapter becomes a major source of recommendations for actions in response to the data analysis. Summary information about reported studies may include information about sampling, data gathering instruments/procedures, statistical analysis, findings, recommendations, etc. A minimum of twenty sources is expected for this chapter in its final form. It usually begins with a "world view" of the problem and then focuses on relevant studies, it is usually helpful if the rest of the chapter is organized under three or more subheadings with relevant information from the reported studies/articles under each subheading – this is, in effect, three or more small papers all relevant to your study.


CHAPTER III (3-10 pages)

  1. METHODOLOGY: This chapter describes in detail how the student will approach the problem to achieve the stated objective (s).
    Sub headings could include:
  2. TARGET POPULATION this describes who/what is being studied. For example, "data will be obtained from production records for each of the 5 years under study." Or, "A representative sample will be taken from all full time employees during August of 200_".
  3. SAMPLE SELECTION, this tells the reader if you are using a census
    or a sample of the target population. It also explains what type of sample and how you decided what people or records, etc. were to be in the sample. Describe the sampling frame and the sampling technique used in this study. The sampling may be for cost data, for attitudes, for company records, etc.
  4. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: This will answer the question of what data you will collect and how you will collect it. You must answer at least four (4) questions:
    (a) What data will I collect? (b) Where will this data come from?
    (c) How will I analyze this data? (t test, chi square, return on investment, etc.) (d) What do I have to see to make a decision?
    Stated decision criteria are necessary here "If the return on investment is 10% or more within two years it will be recommended to the investors…" "If scores increase by 10% or more, this will interpreted as an effective training method" "If the difference in group scores is significant at the .05 level, a recommendation to continue merit pay…". If you are using a survey, a fifth question is "what is the minimum accepted return rate? And, what action will be taken to meet that return rate if is not met by a specified time or in the initial distribution of the survey?"
  5. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY: This describes efforts taken by the student to assure first, the reliability and second, the validity of the data
    In surveys this is normally pilot tests, review by qualified judges, or statistically testing for validity, but there are other procedures.
  6. SCOPE and LIMITATIONS: This describes what is to be included
    or excluded from the study. It sets the broad parameters and then limits the student's concerns/actions. "Only employees with six or months with the company will be included in the survey. The study does not examine …. or consider the cost of ….
  7. REFERENCES: All references and the paper style are to be done using APA guidelines. The bibliography at the end of the paper includes all references except personal interviews.
  8. For the final paper include, all three chapters above (in past tense !!! ) and the following: Executive Summary (1-2 pages), Chapter 4 (10-30 pages),Chapter 5 (4-12 pages), Bibliography (3-5 pages), Appendix (0-50 pages).

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