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Research Papers on The Lord of the Rings and Classic Myths

Research Papers on Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings trilogy, published in 1955, tell the tale set in the mythological land of Middle Earth. Although it is a relatively modern work that has become a part of popular culture, there are many similarities between The Lord of the Rings and classic myths that originated in Europe and Iceland. This research paper paper will compare the The Lord of the Rings to one of the following stories:Lord of the Rings and Classic Myths

The research paper will discuss similarities and differences between these works and Tolkien's, including the perception of good and evil, love, the movement from ignorance to intelligence, and the nature of fate for characters in the Middle Ages. This research paper will demonstrate that The Lord of the Rings combines many elements from each tale, while offering a distinct story with many heroes, rather than one or two. At the same time, there were many differences in the perception of good and evil, ideas about love, and the nature of fate. While The Lord of the Rings shares common elements with many legends from the Middle Ages, Literature research papers form Paper Masters show it remains distinct in many ways.

There are many connections between The Lord of the Rings and classic myths that originated in Europe and Iceland. In comparing The Lord of the Rings to Beowulf, the Song of Roland, Tristan and Iseult, the Volsunga Saga, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, it appeared that The Lord of the Rings combines many elements from each tale, while offering a distinct story with many heroes, rather than one or two. At the same time, there were many differences in the perception of good and evil, ideas about love, and the nature of fate. While The Lord of the Rings shares common elements with many legends from the Middle Ages, it remains distinct in many ways.

In Tolkien’s novels, magic rings are divided among the Elves, the Dwarves and mortal men, with the most powerful ring belonging to the Dark Lord, Sauron. In spite of their powers, these rings ultimately drain away the good from their wearers and eventually reduce the wearer to little more than a ghost. The instant lust for the ring’s power is apparent when the “good” characters, Bilbo, Frodo and even Galadriel, are tempted by it. Sauron is intent on getting possession of the ring of power, which has ended up in the keeping of the hobbit Frodo. The only way to destroy the ring, and with it the power of all the rings, is to take it back to Mount Mordor, Sauron’s kingdom, where it was created. Frodo, along with three other hobbits, and a company of Elves, Dwarves, and Men, make the treacherous journey, and eventually destroy the ring. With its destruction, however, it is clear that the old age (the Third Age of Middle-Earth) is at an end, and the Elves, who are the most godlike of its inhabitants, will soon leave for the Grey Havens, making way for an age of Men.

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