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Language Delay

Language delay involves delays in speech or language development. It occurs when a child develops language skills in the typical sequence but a slower than typical pace. Children with language delay may be slower: to understand words or phrases, to say their first words, to learn new words, and/or to combine words to make phrases. A language delay is qualitatively different from a speech or language disorder, which occur when language skills develop at a typical pace but with atypical features. For instance, some children with speech disorders find it difficult to enunciate certain word sounds. Language Delay

Nevertheless, although they experience such pronunciation difficulties, children with speech disorders are often more adept than peers with language delays at understanding words and phrases well and at forming sentences of their own. Language delays are the most common developmental challenge and are believed to affect between 5 and 10 percent of all preschoolers. They are sometimes temporary and may resolve on their own with little specialist intervention. However, some language delays may be indicative of more serious underlying disability or developmental disorders, including hearing impairment, non-linguistic developmental delay, an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), or Down syndrome. Language delays may also cause behavioral problems in children who become frustrated by their inabilities to express their needs and wishes. Some recent research indicates that children who experience language delay may develop long-term emotional challenges stemming from their early difficulties with communication.

Related Research Paper Topics

Speech Delay research papers discuss the behaviors of children with speech delay and examine the possible causes.

Language Research Papers look at the different ways in which we use language in society.

Speech Impairment term papers discuss the inability to produce normal speech sounds, ranging from mild to severe.

Language Skills research papers examine the language skill development from infancy and early childhood, when human capacities for language learning are immense.

Articulation Disorder research papers examine the physical processes involved in the production of speech and look into what causes difficulties in speech and pronunciation.

Language Development in Infants focus on the progress infants make after birth in recognizing speech and comprehending the meaning of sounds.

Speech and Down Syndrome research papers examine problems with down syndrome children for educators.

Nonverbal Learning Disorder research papers look into the neurological disorder that displays a significant discrepancy between higher verbal skills and the lower skills.