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Kinesthetic Learning Style

When considering the various ways a person learns, three common learning styles emerge: auditory, visual, and kinesthetic. While the first refers to a person's need to listen to something and the second refers to their need to see something, the kinesthetic learning style requires someone to be active for the information being presented to be effectively retained. Students who succeed with this learning style often rely on the association between physical movement and the content being presented; allowing them to be active in some way can help enhance the learning experience and increase their overall retention and success rates.

Kinesthetic Learners

Kinesthetic Learning

For some kinesthetic learners or those with kinesthetic intelligence, something as simple as a hands-on demonstration can be effective. Allowing students to manipulate objects when learning such basic concepts as addition and subtraction can be much more effective than a standard lecture or worksheet. Sometimes, using a globe instead of a paper map can be effective as well. For other kinesthetic learners, the action must be much more significant; some kinesthetic learners require physical activity for the information to be effectively retained. Acting out a scene in a story is one way to incorporate this type of learning style; using students themselves as models when learning the basic concepts of addition and subtraction can also work. Naturally, as students reach higher grades, such physical activities become more difficult. By thinking outside the proverbial box, however, teachers can establish hands-on or physical activities that all students can participate in, allowing for the inclusion of those students that rely on the kinesthetic learning style.

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