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Kennedy's Foreign Policy Research Papers

Kennedy's Foreign Policy research paper due and don’t know how to start it? How about like this?

During his tragically shortened presidency, President John F. Kennedy presided over some of the most heated moments of the long Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. Kennedy's Foreign PolicyYour research should examine the following regarding Kennedy and his foreign policy:

  • The foreign policy strategies that Kennedy and his administration pursued in response to the challenges that emerged in the international stage.
  • Demonstrate that these policies were often beset by serious contradictions and undermined by competing international interests.
  • Despite some admirable successes at averting disaster and forwarding American interests internationally, there were also several major failures and compromises of principle.

Kennedy’s presidency began with some positive overtures that suggested that the Soviets sought improved relations with the new American administration. Nonetheless, the young president was heavily constrained in his ability to promote better relations between the superpowers by domestic politics, by gendered domestic perceptions of what America stood for in the world—both of which demanded a tough approach to communism—and by Soviet premier Nikita Krushchev’s defiant rhetoric about his nation’s role in the world. Therefore, although Kennedy’s campaign had promised radical shits in America’s relations with they world, his foreign policy actually adhered rather faithfully to the two fundamental objectives that had governed foreign policy under the preceding Truman and Eisenhower regimes:

  1. The containment of international communism
  2. The prevention of a Third World War.

Where Kennedy’s foreign policy was innovative was in its application of the principles of “Flexible Response,” a term concocted by General Maxwell Taylor—the man who initially served as an adviser to the president and subsequently as Chairman of his Joint Chiefs of Staff. Taylor characterized Flexible Response as “a capability to react across the entire spectrum of possible challenge, for coping with anything from general atomic war to the infiltrations and aggressions that threatens the U.S.

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