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Berkeley High School Students

Berkeley High School Students research paper due and don’t know how to start it? How about like this?

You can examine the lives of high school or secondary students through the Frontline Video done on Berkeley High School students called "School Colors". Watch the film and then, for one or more of the Berkeley High School students (see the names and quotes below), answer the following questions:

  1. Give a description of the student: what is his/her background, his/her family life, who s/he hangs out with at school, what kinds of activities are s/he is involved in and what are his/her interests?
  2. Which of the four-acculturation/ethnic identity styles do you think best describes the student? Why? Give specific examples to back up your choice.
  3. During adolescence there are several cognitive changes (e.g., ability for abstract thinking, hypothetical thinking, critical thinking, metacognition, etc.) which have implications for moral, political, and religious development. Does the student exhibit these more advanced ways of thinking? Give specific examples of whether the student can or cannot think in these ways. You can describe his/her political involvement, moral reasoning, views on issues such as segregation, interracial dating, etc.
  4. Optional: Which ethnic identity style would you classify yourself as and why?

Students from School Colors Video:

Geoff (African-American): They don’t focus on the Black, so we have to focus on the Black?

Arthur (Chinese-American): I’m ashamed to be Chinese in America?

Faith (African-American, Native-American, French, Russian): Someone yelled out to me, hey she’s a walking identity crisis?

Xochitl (Latino): I’ll try to promote unity between Chicanos and Latinos, La Raza?

Eddie (Russian-American): I’m in crew they aren’t used to a poor kid like me?

Berkeley High School Students and Higher Education

Every year, about 1.2 million students graduating from high school apply to colleges with the hopes of being accepted and continuing their educations. Each student comes from a diverse background and unique high school experience. They submit their application packets to admissions offices filled with grade point averages, lists of the courses they took, descriptions of extracurricular activities and teacher recommendations. They take college entrance examinations and write essays. Parents stand by and cross their fingers, knowing that the admissions standards at the preferred institution must be met in order for their child to get in. They know that entry into college is the first step toward graduating with a degree and living a successful life. This report looks at the admissions process and the applicability of admissions standards in professional schools. But in order to look at how applicable the admissions standards are, a look back is in order.

Higher education and how students obtain degrees is changing. Finances, grades, and all the extras have traditionally affected who can attend professional schools and graduate from degree programs. But technology and college prep curriculum determine who stays and succeeds. And because getting past the admissions process is the first step, William Tierney, in his article, “The Changing Landscape of Higher Education: The Future of College Admission,” suggests that admissions counselors help prospective students qualify for admittance. He believes college admissions officers should work together with counselors and students to not just get students into a school of choice, but make sure they are academically prepared to succeed. Historically, there have been times when what was good for an institution was not always in the best interest of its students. Admissions standards should always be in the best interest of both. That’s why the job of the admissions staff is to make sure that both the academic and admissions standards are connected and met by prospective students. And standards should reflect diversity. For focusing on the same type of student causes the institution to miss out on the chance to become more exceptional and more successful.

 

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