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Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) was the 7th President of the United States. Jackson grew up poor in the backwoods Carolina country, eventually learning enough to become a frontier lawyer in Tennessee.

Andrew Jackson is well-known for the following:

Research papers that discuss presidential politics and Andrew Jackson have a wide variety of topics to cover. Paper Masters can help you write a research paper on Andrew Jackson and his place in history.

Andrew Jackson

Jackson as a Commander

In 1801, Jackson became a commander of the Tennessee militia, quickly rising to major general. During the War of 1812, Jackson won the Battle of Horseshoe bend in 1814 against the Red Stick Creek Indians and the Battle of New Orleans in 1815, where he earned the nickname “Old Hickory” and national fame. From 1817 to 1821, Jackson was in Florida, fighting the First Seminole War and becoming military governor.

In 1824, Jackson ran for President. Despite winning the popular vote, the election went to the House of Representatives, which declared John Quincy Adams as President. Jackson won the presidency in 1828 and was reelected in 1832. His administration is notable for the destruction of the Second Bank of the United States and the creation of the spoils system for federal appointments. Jackson was also instrumental in the Indian Removal Policy, which relocated thousands of Native Americans from their homes in the southeast to Indian Territory (Oklahoma), resulting in thousands of deaths.

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