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Race in Othello

Race in Othello can be examined in research papers from Paper Masters. For example, throughout Othello research papers, the title character is well-aware that he is "different" from others in Venice (where the play is set). Though he is held in great favor by the rulers of the state, Othello nonetheless considers himself separate from the natives of Venice. Race in OthelloEarly in the play, race in Othello research papers point out that Othello is referred to as “the Moor (Act I,), and as “thick lips” (Act I). In fact, we do not even know his name until Act I, Scene iii. Though Othello is an outsider, in that he is not a native of Venice and his skin color is different, he nonetheless is valued because of his military expertise. And, though Othello might feel apart from the Venetian nobility, he still says he is accepted: “Desdemona’s father loved me, oft invited me, still questioned me the story of my life, from year to year (Act I, Scene iii).

Despite this acceptance, Othello never considers himself anything but an outsider, perhaps because he is black. He even indulges in a bit of self-denigration in Act I, scene iii: “Rude am I in my speech, and little blessed with the soft phrase of peace”. Yet, Othello is so in love with Desdemona that he does not allow his racial difference to interfere with his marriage. Even when Cassio is stabbed and Roderigo is killed outside a brothel (Act II, Scene iii), Othello simply tells Desdemona in Othello – who has heard the commotion – to go to bed and forget everything.
  To this point, Othello does not dwell on his being black. However, that changes very quickly.

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